Farm fresh produce to schools endangered

Awhile back on an NPR report the government was making it more and more difficult for schools and local farmers to benefit directly from each other.

To be continued…

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Stir fry 3 ways

The best way to make a healthy dinner different and delicious every day of the week.

I would like to say fast, but the veggie, meat and sauce prep can take a little more time than making a hamburger. I have learned to enjoy the process of creating recipes, cutting and prepping the ingredients and perfecting the cook times and methods. Stir fry’s seem so simple, but they can take some practice to cook all the different ingredients just right for great flavor and texture.

A shortlist of my basic ingredients for a flavorful sauce starts with a fresh olive, grapeseed, or toasted sesame oil. I splash some sesame oil on at the end with toasted sesame seeds, cashews, raw sunflower, pumpkin or hemp seeds especially when I’m not adding any animal protein.

After browning the animal protein, shrimp, scallops, chicken, beef or pork I deglaze the pan with rice vinegar or apple cider vinegar in a pinch. I place delicate proteins, such as, shrimp and scallops, in a separate bowl so they won’t over cook.

Then I sauté the chopped onion with a dash of salt then clear a circle at the bottom of the pan to add in the minced garlic. After a few minutes, when the onions are a little translucent, I’ll toss in quartered mushrooms to give them plenty of time to release their juices. Then I add a root vegetable like burdock root, carrots, beets, (yellow as muddy red is not a good look for a stir fry).

Finally I layer the remainder of the ingredients, usually vegetables based on their hardness, therefore, cooking times. A quick list of my favorites and in order of adding to wow: kale, mustard greens, celery, peas green or snap, boc choy, bell peppers etc. I sauté each ingredient for a very short time before tossing in herbs and sometimes cubed tofu or another alternative proteins that just need to be heated.

At this point I’ll splash in some sesame oil, soy sauce or go in a different direction with dash of curry spice, plum paste, oyster or fish sauce, saracha or any other flavorings that are complementary to the mix of vegetables and proteins I’ve added. I would like to say I plan this before starting to sauté, but I often change my mind at the last minute, assuming I had a plan to begin with. I admit this is not a good practice. I have rarely discovered superb flavors combos using this method…